BBS Seminar: Searching for the Abominable Snowman: Exploring the Elusive Nature of Collective Leadership (cancelled)

This event has now passed.

Date: 24 March 2020
Venue: OJ11, Bristol Business School, Frenchay Campus
Venue Location: https://www1.uwe.ac.uk/about/visitus/campusmapsandinformation/frenchaycampus/frenchaycampusmaps.aspx
Time: 14:00-16:30


Please note: this event has been cancelled.

Summary

Join us for the Bristol Business School Seminar: Searching for the Abominable Snowman: Exploring the Elusive Nature of Collective Leadership". This event will be proceeding Jackie Ford's Distinguished Professorial Address.

"Leadership is like the Abominable Snowman, whose footprints are everywhere but who is nowhere to be seen." (Bennis and Nanus, 1985)

It is 35 years since and Meindl et al. (1985) coined the notion of the "Romance of Leadership" to explain the tendency to over-emphasise the importance of 'leaders' in shaping organisational life and accomplishing 'leadership' outcomes. Despite a huge expansion of leadership theory, research, practice and development in the intervening years, leadership remains "elusive and enigmatic" - heralded as both the cause of and solution to almost all challenges facing groups, organisations and society.

Since the turn of the millennium, despite growing interest in 'collective' forms of leadership, which have helped shift the focus from the traits, characteristics and behaviours of 'leaders' to the social processes of 'leadership' "we have been unable to generate an understanding of leadership that is both intellectually compelling and emotionally satisfying" (Meindl et al., 1985, p. 78) and the myth of the 'heroic leader' continues to dominate mainstream perspectives on leadership.

This symposium includes contributions from a number of scholars who have been actively engaged in scholarship on collective leadership over many years, who will reflect on their insights and experiences to speculate on the potential causes of and responses to the "slippery, shape-shifting" (Ospina et al., 2017: 1) nature of collective leadership.

Following the two presentations participants will be invited to share and reflect on their own experiences of researching, teaching and practicing collective leadership and the implications for future scholarship in this field.
There is no fee for attending this event and participants are warmly invited to stay on for the Distinguished Professorial Address by Professor Jackie Ford later in the day.

Social Constructions of Collective Leadership: The performative nature of empty signifiers

Gareth Edwards - Associate Professor in Leadership Development, UWE, Bristol
Richard Bolden - Professor of Leadership and Management, UWE, Bristo
l

This paper uses reflexive conversations to explore how concepts of 'collective leadership' have been socially constructed in leadership research and practice over the past twenty years. Particular attention is given to the processes of social constructive-ness through which 'collective leadership' is framed and reframed, and the role of both researchers and practitioners in this process.

The paper contributes to theory, research and practice in three inter-connected ways - firstly by highlighting the performative nature of 'collective leadership' through a social constructivist lens; secondly by developing the notion of negative ontology by applying it to empirical evidence in order to uncover and problematize theories of collective leadership; and thirdly, by making the link between negative ontology and critical performativity in order to demonstrate how researchers and theorists can disclose stages of performativity in the development of new theories.

The Transformational Object of Leadership: A critique in two agonies and eight fits

Jackie Ford, Professor of Leadership and Organisation Studies, Durham University Business School
Nancy Harding, Professor of HRM, University of Bath School of Management
Sarah Gilmore, Reader in Organization Studies, Cardiff University Business School

A special journal issue that explored the tricky question of how to research collective leadership was recently announced which described the very term of collective leadership as 'a slippery, shape-shifting phenomenon' (Ospina, et al., 2017: 1) that has generated much theory, but is difficult to research empirically.

The same could also be said about much of the work on researching, conceptualising and practising leadership. This paper questions the rationale for searching for appropriate research methods. We argue the necessity for a more sophisticated account of the human subject of leadership approaches before researching leadership in practice. Without such careful preparation there is a risk, firstly, that researchers see what they expect to see. Secondly, we warn that without better understanding of the human subject, leadership could be for ill rather than good, and could contribute to the contemporary forces undermining democracy, liberalism, tolerance and individual freedoms.

These arguments are inspired by Lewis Carroll's epic nonsense poem The Hunting of the Snark: an Agony in Eight Fits, and the insights of psychoanalytical object relations theory. Turning our arguments back on ourselves, we conclude that the times dictate that we, the collective of leadership theorists, turn our efforts to understanding and intervening in trends that threaten to undermine justice, democracy, citizenship, equity, and equality. In Carroll's terms, we are caught in the fruminous jaws of the Bandersnatch, may be summoning up the dangerous Boojum, and have lost sight of the Snark.

References
Bennis, W. and Nanus, B. (1985) Leaders: The Strategies for Taking Charge. New York: Harper and Row.
Meindl, J.R., Ehrlich, S.B., & Dukerich, J.M. (1985). The romance of leadership. Administrative Science Quarterly, 30, 78-102.
Ospina SM, Foldy EG, Fairhurst GT and Jackson B (2017) Collective dimensions of leadership: The challenges of connecting theory and method. Human Relations, http://www.tavinstitute.org/humanrelations/special_issues/LeadershipCollectiveDimensions.html

Cost: Free
Contact: Gareth Edwards
E-mail: Gareth3.Edwards@uwe.ac.uk

Back to top